Runner Moms Podcast | Episode 003

Acknowledging and healing postpartum challenges: A conversation with Coach Alison Marie Helms.

Running Coach Alison Marie Helms joins Runner Moms Founder Shayla Ebsen on the show to discuss the importance of acknowledging and healing postpartum challenges. Alison discusses the postpartum challenges that she accepted as normal for years until she finally reached a breaking point and took action to heal her body. Alison and Shayla also discuss body image issues and other challenges that runner moms often face.

As a special offer to the Runner Moms community, Alison is offering 10% off her Navigating Postpartum Fitness for Runners course with the coupon code, RunnerMoms. Simply enter the coupon code RunnerMoms during the checkout process on her website.

Support the Runner Moms Podcast: https://www.patreon.com/RunnerMoms

Episode Highlights:

Alison first began running with her mom when she was 10 years old. Her competitive nature inspired her to run track through middle and high school. After taking a hiatus from running in undergrad, Alison returned to the sport in grad school where she began writing training plans for her friends.

Alison’s background in engineering and teaching influences her approach to coaching. She focuses on breaking training programs down to the essential elements and offers easy-to-follow, step-by-step plans that are designed to help mom runners achieve their goals and heal their bodies in the postpartum stage of their lives.

She views postpartum running as an opportunity to slow down and start tuning into the body’s little signs when you’re running that runners often choose to ignore, and become a stronger runner because of it.

As a mom of two, Alison talks through the differences between her postpartum journeys with each of her children. She also discusses the problems with incontinence that she faced after her first pregnancy and the actions she took to heal her body several years later.

Alison is offering 10% off her Navigating Postpartum Fitness for Runners course with the coupon code, RunnerMoms. Simply enter the coupon code RunnerMoms during the checkout process on her website: https://alisonmariephd.vipmembervault.com/af/93690270/1034083

Connect with Coach Alison Marie Helms:

Instagram: AlisonMariePhD
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alisonmariephd
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXMiztbXsBOTn9k-NaD6RVQ
Website: https://www.alisonmariephd.com

Episode Transcript:

Introduction:

Welcome to the Runner Moms Podcast where we help women embrace their inner strength, take time for themselves and lead healthier lives. So, settle in and soak up some inspiration. Then rise, lace up those running shoes and embrace your inner strength because, momma, you run this world. 

Shayla:

Hello Runner Moms! I’m Shayla Ebsen, Founder of the Runner Moms community. Joining me on the show today is Alison Marie Helms. She’s a Postpartum Fitness and Running Coach as well as the creator of the Navigating Postpartum Fitness for Runners Course.

As a National Academy of Sports Medicine Pre and Postnatal Certified Personal Trainer and Postpartum Corrective Exercise Specialist, Alison has helped countless busy moms crush the overwhelm by using a simple, step-by-step formula to regain control over their bodies and lives so they can meet the challenges of motherhood. She’s been featured in a variety of media outlets including FitFluential and SHAPE magazine.

In addition to her fitness certification and expertise, Alison holds a Doctorate in Chemical Engineering from Georgia Tech. She has taught everything from sixth grade through collegiate level engineering courses. Her efficient scientific approach and passion for teaching shines through in her coaching programs.

Alison has so much great, actionable advice that I can’t wait to share with you. With that, welcome to the Runner Moms podcast, Alison!

Alison:

Thank you!

Shayla:

Yeah, I’m so excited to have you on the show! Just to get started, do you just want to give us a little background about yourself? Maybe where you live, your professional background, how many kids you have? All those important details.

Alison:

I live in South Carolina now but I’m not a southern native. I’m from Massachusetts originally. I moved to the south to Georgia for grad school at Georgia Tech. I have a background in engineering, so it was a big pivot, or small pivot if you look at the science behind training and the strategy, they’re all related. But I came down for grad school in engineering with this, “I’m gonna move back as soon as I’m done mentality”, and now I’ve been here for almost 15 years. And I don’t plan on moving back! The ability to run year-round without trudging through the snow, that, it had me. 

I have two kids, two boys, a seven-year-old and an almost seven-month-old, which I can’t believe. It’s flying by. It has been interesting, the second time around. Doing it only from home with nobody else around, it has been weird. 

My background in training: I started as a personal trainer about six years ago and I’ve been coaching moms exclusively pretty much the entire time but it has evolved into really focusing on that newer postpartum area within the last two years. 

Shayla:

I can’t wait to dive into all of those details about your business and your coaching here in just a little bit. To start us off, do you just want to tell us a little bit about your journey as a runner? Maybe, when you first started running and what your running journey looked like up until you became a mom seven years ago?

Alison:

I started running with my mom actually when I was 10 or 11. She was running for more of like a social thing that she did with her friends and started inviting me to come on runs. I ran my first long distance race the, Falmouth Road Race for those of you who are familiar with it. It’s a big race up north which was about 7.2 miles when I was 11. So, I have been into it pretty much my entire life. I ran track, was on the cross-country team, all those things. Took a little bit of a hiatus from it in undergrad, just busy with schoolwork and I mentioned the winters in New England were crushing that. In high school I was kind of able to take a break from running in the wintertime because I also did gymnastics, so it was kind of a good flip and something else to do when it was way too cold out. 

Took a little break from it in undergrad and then once I got into grad school, I started running. I had never really done a race longer than 7 miles before then, but some friends convinced me to sign up for a half marathon. I thought I’d try it once but, it’s one of those things, it’s just kind of addicting. So, I did another and another but with the mentality that I’m never going to run a marathon. I’m only going to do a half marathon. And then you get that itch. So, I was like, ok, I’ll try a marathon and I did one and my time was pretty close to qualifying for Boston but not quite. So, then I was like, well, now I’m going to do another one and I’m going to try to qualify for Boston and it just kind of spiraled out of control from there!

I did end up qualifying for Boston. I’ve run that twice now and it’s just one of those experiences. Someday, I will be back. But, then I had a baby and the longest race that I’ve done since then is a half marathon. The time it takes to train for a marathon is definitely doable as a mom but it’s just not one of my priorities right now. I’m staying more with the shorter races, working in some spartan because strength training has been a new love of mine over the past six or seven years. 

Shayla:

What years did you run Boston?

Alison:

2010 and 2011.

Shayla:

Awesome! Going back for just a bit to when you first started running, kind of from the spurring of your mom, did she grow up as a runner?

Alison:

No. She might kill me for telling you this! She came from a really large family. She’s the oldest of 11. Her brothers were very athletic and they got all of the attention from dad because of their athletics. So, she tried track in high school, sort of because of that, but never really loved it as a sport so much as just a source of friendships, consistency with fitness sort of thing. So, my evolution with running has been a lot different than hers because I am super competitive with it and she definitely did not get that, or I definitely did not get that gene from her!

Shayla:

Do you have any best memories of running with her when you were young?

Alison:

This is going to sound bad too, but my best memories are the times when I was faster than her! Because, again, the aforementioned competitiveness! But, no, it was just something to do where we could connect. I don’t have any specific memories of a moment or a day. I’m the oldest of three. She worked full-time, two other kids, it was just that one thing that just me and her did together with, not the other ones. 

Shayla:

I think that’s awesome. Our daughter is seven and I’ve been trying to take her out on runs here and there. I can see there is a little bit of a spark there. Just something kind of special that hopefully builds some good memories. I just think that’s awesome that she did that with you. 

Well, let’s focus for a bit on when you first became a mom. Going back seven years ago, what did your life look like as a new mom both career-wise and fitness-wise? And maybe tell us a little about the journey of regaining your fitness postpartum.

Alison:

Wow, there’s a lot to unpack there! When I first became a mom, I mentioned I had a background in engineering but, from there, I went into teaching as a public-school teacher, middle and high school. So, I took a year off from that when my son was born. He was born in the summer, so it was just kind of a natural transition. Finished the school year and took the next school year off. So, I stayed home with him. That first year was great to spend time with him but also incredibly lonely and I think that running was the only thing that I had. Also, at the same time, it’s also probably not something that I should have been doing. 

So, after I had him, I just needed to get back out and start running. It was my thing that made me feel like me. It was the source of most of my friendships at the time through Moms Run This Town or now it’s called She Runs this Town. I went back into running at a little over seven weeks postpartum and I peed my pants pretty much the entire time and I continued to do it. I incorporated strength training while I was saying home with him. That year was actually when I got my personal training certification. I dabbled in it. I wrote training plans for many of my friends before that, but I wasn’t an official trainer, so I got certified. Through that, I worked in more strength training. Before that, I used to just run and nothing else. But, worked in some strength training. 

It got better. I got stronger as a runner. But, it really took me years to realize that it was a problem that I probably should pay a little more attention to fixing. I think that is such the runner mentality. Just run through it. Just go. This little thing hurts, this thing is wrong, but it’s not that big of a deal. I can do it. I can push through. 

I just hit a wall with it. I was running a race with my husband almost six years postpartum. So, there is a lot in between but, just to kind of wrap up the postpartum journey with when I actually did something about it. I was doing this race and I was going pretty fast. We were running on a team and I was feeling like I could be the first female finisher on the team and then I hit a downhill. With every step, I was just peeing my pants. Through this race, I was booking it on the flats, booking it passing all these people on the uphills and then had to walk the downhills. And it was, just so incredibly frustrating. I needed to do something about this. 

That’s when I finally got into the more postpartum focused fitness. I went and got a postpartum corrective exercise specialist and really dove into all of the things that I really probably should have been doing from the beginning. It’s so much more than just core and pelvic floor. Everything in my hips was off. Now, I look back on it and I didn’t really realize it at the time. Postpartum symptoms are not just pelvic floor, peeing your pants. It was the hip pains I had, the low back pain, the stress in my neck and shoulders. It was all related to what I didn’t do and what I should have done postpartum before getting back into running or with getting back into running. 

Now, I look back on it. It was interesting, I mentioned I ran Boston before having children. Randomly, I got an email from Boston Marathon with marathon photos a couple of weeks ago with all of the pictures from my 2011 race. I looked at her. I looked at her stride and the muscle definition in her legs and, I’m like, given the time to train, I feel like I could smoke her now, which was a really cool feeling. 

I’ve adopted this mindset now and I talk about it a lot. Postpartum running is really an opportunity to stop and slow down and start tuning into all of those little signs that your body gives you when you’re running that we as runners completely choose to ignore, and become a stronger runner because of it. 

Shayla:

Absolutely. I love what you said about looking back and you know that you could smoke her now. I think so much strength comes with being a mother that we don’t give ourselves credit for. Yeah, if we just pause and tune into ourselves and our bodies, I mean, we could find so much power and do so many great things. 

When you had that realization that this wasn’t working and that something needed to change, what were those steps that you started taking, those corrective actions to overcome the issues that you were facing?

Alison:

The very first thing that I did, and I would recommend this to all women who have had a baby, is, I went and saw a pelvic floor physical therapist. They were able to help me uncover where my weaknesses were. I remember the first time. It was a very humbling experience because I felt like I was very strong, and they found all the parts of me that weren’t. I left in tears after the first time, I’m going to be honest. But, that’s when I started to adopt that opportunity mindset. Yeah, it sucked to have pointed out all of these places where I wasn’t strong but then I was able to work on them. 

The main things for me, and I think it’s really common for runners, we worry about pelvic floor weakness in postpartum time. But, a lot of times, it can be pelvic floor tightness, or an overworked pelvic floor and the latter is a lot more common with runners. It definitely was part of my problem. My pelvic floor was tight. It was overworked, just because my glutes weren’t really doing their job and the balance in my hips. So, I spent a lot of time focusing on strengthening that part of my body. I used to kind of joke that I was born with no butt. Flat – thanks, mom! 

There are some women who have the nice, round bottom and I’m just flat as a board back there! It was, again, just another one of those things where I just thought, “yep, this is my life so I’m just going to accept it”. But, in reality, there’s something I could have done about it. Not just for the aesthetics, and I wasn’t going to do it for the aesthetics because I didn’t care that much, but when I knew that it was affecting my running, that’s when I was like, “ohhhh, glutes are important! More, than just how they look”. Everything became glute focused and balancing around my hips. Then just getting as strong as I possibly could in that part of my body and core, obviously. 

Shayla:

You’re now six months postpartum with your second child. What would you say are the main differences in this postpartum journey and your first one?

Alison:

A lot! On the fitness side of it, the main difference was I came at this with a strategy. With an understanding that, I want to run again as soon as possible, but these are the things that I need to do first. So, I really focused on checking through that strategy first. Re-establishing my breathing and the connection with my core and pelvic floor. Doing those exercises even at two weeks postpartum. It’s simple just lying there on the floor while attempting tummy time with the baby. Then, strategically kind of relaxing the muscles that get amped up during pregnancy – hip flexors and low back – while trying to strengthen my core. 

Once I was cleared for exercise, it was right back at that focusing on getting strong and balanced in my hip musculature before I even thought about running. I waited until 10 weeks postpartum this time, which I say with a little hesitation because the general guidelines do recommend 12 weeks postpartum is when you start with running. But, the coronavirus and just everything going on, I got to the point where I just needed to get out of the house alone and just run. The other change instead of just going out and running a couple of slow miles was I started with run/walk intervals. I think that was a huge piece to getting back to running stronger because it really allows you, in those short amounts of time, to really tune in with your body. The biggest thing postpartum this time versus last is I have been practicing, I wouldn’t say I’ve mastered it, checking my ego. When my body is telling me that it’s not the right thing to do, ignoring that mentality that I developed over almost three decades of, just do it. Instead, just don’t do it. Focus on what my body really needs at the time. 

Shayla:

Absolutely. Really, I think that’s a particular struggle for moms because we push through so many things in life. If we aren’t feeling well but the kids aren’t feeling well, we focus on the kids and we push through our own pain. You have to tune into your body if you want to be a strong runner for life. You just have to tune in and pay attention to those cues and avoid those injuries. 

Alison:

Yeah, like you said, it’s not just a runner thing. It’s a mom thing too. Then, when you’re a runner mom, man, that mentality is hard to get over. 

Shayla:

Mmm-hmm. Let’s turn for a little bit and talk about your coaching business. You started out as a chemical engineer and transitioned into being a fitness coach. Can you talk us through what spurred that transition and how does your background as a scientist inform or influence your approach as a coach?

Alison:

It’s funny that you asked that because I’ve actually been reflecting on this moment a lot recently. I have this vivid memory from grad school of walking back from the gym after class and talking with my best friend. My running friend at the time. I was making plans for some of the other runner friends that I had met in research groups. Just loving getting to nerd out on the strategy of it all and I said to her, ‘it would be so cool if I could just do this for my job’. At the time, I was super fed up with grad school at the time too because it just gets old after a while. We both just kind of laughed it off like, ‘you’re here getting your PhD in chemical engineering and you want to write running training plans’. Now, I’m here doing that and yeah, that is really what I wanted to do with my life. It just took me a while to get here!

So, I didn’t actually go directly from engineering to coaching fitness. I went into teaching first. So, I just decided that I didn’t really want to be in academic research. I really like the coaching and teaching aspect of what I did as a grad student. I started as a teaching assistant and I just loved that mentorship place. That role. So, it evolved into wanting to go into teaching. So, I applied for Teach for America after grad school and I was placed to teach sixth grade science in inner city Atlanta which was a very large jump from teaching engineering classes at a big research university. But, I actually loved it. Through that, I started coaching a girls’ running program, Girls on the Run. I was kind of marrying together all of the things that I loved to do. 

In that year off from teaching after I had my son, I really focused on making the fitness side of it more official. I became a certified fitness trainer and just started training on the side from there because I still taught after having my son for a couple more years. I just trained on the side and then I made it my full-time business online when we decided to live in our RV and travel for two years. So, I had to pull the plug on teaching, and, in some ways, it was the thing that made me pull the plug on teaching and go all in on my coaching business. So that was the time that I officially, completely transitioned. That was probably about two years into being a personal trainer already.

To answer the question of how it all influences the way I coach, I think both my teaching experience and my science and engineering background significantly influence the way I coach. Everything is very organized into smaller bite-size pieces. Nothing I do is just like, ‘here, do these exercises’. I’m educating you on your body and why you need to do these exercises. Where you should be feeling these exercises. When you’ve mastered these exercises, where do you go from here so that you can take ownership of it yourself. I think that really comes from being a teacher and wanting to teach you how to do it instead of just give you exercises to do.

The engineering side, it’s all strategy for me. People used to ask what I did as a chemical engineer. The questions I always got were if I made drugs or if I made bombs. Well, neither, personally. A chemical engineer really is taking chemistry and physics and making the processes as efficient as possible. That’s the mentality that I take to fitness. I take all of the information and all of the body science of it and I break it down to the simplest form of what actually works so that it’s packaged in a form that you can do it one step at a time. 

Shayla:

And that’s what moms need, right? I mean, we’re so overwhelmed with everything in our lives! Just break it down for me. Tell me what I need to do in an efficient manner and, yeah, absolutely. 

Looking at your role as a coach for moms. A bit ago, you talked about the fitness challenges that you faced. Are there any similar challenges that you see moms just accepting as part of their lives now, maybe because of embarrassment about vocalizing the challenges they’re facing or because, maybe they think ‘well, this is just how my body is now’?

Alison:

Yes. So many different things and on so many different levels. Starting with the incontinence. There are so many jokes made about it. You know, the peeing when you sneeze and peeing when you run and just accepting it as what’s normal. It’s totally common but the saying in the women’s health industry is common but not normal. I don’t like that either because I don’t like to be called not normal. I say common but not something you have to accept as your new normal and that you can do something about it. It’s not something that you just have to accept but it’s also not something that’s really that big of a deal. Whatever, I’ll change my underwear when I’m done running. People just kind of go past it. But that’s not the only postpartum symptom for runners. Incontinence for one but it can be pelvic pain, hip pain, foot pain, knee pain, low back pain or pain in your shoulders. 

All of those things can be related to pregnancy and, a lot of times, it’s a very simple fix once you take the time to do it. But that’s the whole postpartum mom mentality problem in general. We’re so busy doing the next thing and the next thing and there are so many things that I should already be doing. I already feel like I’m not doing enough. How can I possibly take more time to do this other thing even if this other thing might make my life easier in the long run? We just go through the motions in everything. I’m using running and fitness as examples but, in so many parts of our lives, we need to stop doing that for just a minute to reset and see what really matters. 

Shayla:

Yeah, I mean personally as a mom, my life gets so wrapped up in the routines of my children sometimes that I just put myself off to the side and don’t notice what’s going on with my mind and body and all of that other stuff. I just hope that the listeners and others who are maybe struggling with postpartum challenges that they hear your message that it could really be a simple fix. You don’t have to keep struggling with this. Just tune into your body and take the steps to correct and figure out. Yeah, I think that’s great advice. 

Alison:

For most people, fixing the way they breathe, which is something that you do all day every day, just taking a couple of minutes every day, can get you, I can’t put a number on it, but I always say, like 90% of the way. Depending on the needs of your body, maybe more or less. Breathing deeply really is the foundation of it all. It’s something that we do all day every day anyway, so why not just take a minute to figure out and tune in with it.

Shayla:

And that’s even something you can do with your children. I think that’s an important skill to teach your children. It can help with anxiety. It can help with so many things. Kind of doing it as a family. 

Alison:

Yes, I definitely have taught my son breathing. Keep breathing. Just breathe! In through your nose and out through your mouth. 

Shayla:

Let’s turn now to the mom who has just a baby. She’s overwhelmed with everything but wants to reclaim her body and her fitness. Do you have any tips for those moms on even where to begin when everything already feels so heavy?

Alison:

Start small. Very almost like stupidly small. Moms who were athletes or really into fitness before I think really struggle with this the most because, in their head, they think of all of things that they used to do or feel like they should do because it’s what they used to do. Life is completely different now. You can and you will be able to do most of those things, if not all of those them and, if not more, someday. But right now, you have to lead with what you actually know you can do. It starts with fueling that consistency and momentum and motivation. I hear a lot of moms say that they’re just not motivated because they used to feel motivated and now they don’t. 

Motivation doesn’t exist. Motivation is momentum. It’s consistency. So, it’s starting with 10 minutes here. Or 5 minutes there. It’s super small first no matter what. You can not do more without doing less first and building the momentum with that. Whether that’s going for a walk. Whether that’s devoting 5 minutes a day to laying on the floor and breathing. Whether that’s just 15 minutes of standing doing hip circles or just something to make a promise to yourself that you know that you can stick to. Once you do that, you will feel more confident. Then you can do the next thing. But, starting with the smallest possible promise is what you need to do to get moving. 

Shayla:

Yes, I love that. And just including your own needs in the priorities of the household. Yeah, 100 percent. 

Alison:

Even if it’s just making sure you’re hydrated. That’s huge. 

Shayla:

For years after having my first child, I felt so uncomfortable in my new body of motherhood. I just wanted so much to return to my pre-motherhood body, but I just felt defeated every time I looked in the mirror. I know a lot of moms struggle with that. Do you have any tips for moms who are facing this inner conflict?

Alison:

This is a part of my coaching and my own mentality that I’ve struggled with for a while. I used to give tips to help with the weight loss and altering your body and what you need to do to help flatten your stomach. But, I choose not to participate in that part of the fitness world any more. Because I think, even with trying to help, we’re placing impossible expectations on many new moms. 

That’s not to say that you can’t be comfortable in your body anymore. It’s more to say that, you will never be comfortable or never feel at home in a body that you want to change. That you feel is temporary. So, I think it’s more about embracing your body and focusing on the needs of your body and what you can do with your body than it is about what your body looks like. I just want more moms to think about it that way. And I know it is so hard to do and it’s super hard for me. Still, I catch myself checking out my stomach in the mirror and I’m like grabbing onto the excess skin and fat and I want it to be gone. But, at the same time, I ask, ‘ok, where are these thoughts coming from’? Are they my own or are they put here, you know, from the outside pressures? I’m really starting to pick that apart. 

I read this quote. I can’t remember it exactly and I wish I had written it down exactly. But, it said, the only way to life on this earth is through the body of a mother. And, if you are focused on losing the inches and losing the pounds and going back to what you looked like before that, you’re diminishing the immense power that that really is. And, I’m trying to really embrace that myself. Again, I know it’s super hard but, as a fitness professional, it’s a weird line to walk that I’m still kind of struggling with as well. 

Shayla:

Yeah, I love that quote. I’m three kids in now, so I think my mindset as evolved over time to more focus on, when I look in the mirror and I slip into that mindset of not being happy with this or that, I just pause and think, ‘well this body gave me these three kids and, in so many ways, I’m so much stronger than I ever was before I had kids so I’m just gonna choose to accept that this will never be as it was before but, in many ways, it’s so much better’. That has kind of helped me. 

Let’s focus for a bit on talking about your Navigating Postpartum Fitness for Runners course. What inspired you to create the course and, maybe tell us a little about what’s included in it? 

Alison:

So, I mentioned that I coached exclusively online for a long time and I just finally settled in South Carolina and I was going to get back into in-person training. I had set up this workshop called Navigating Postpartum Fitness that I had sold tickets for in-person. It was going to be my first thing back that I did after having my son and the first thing I did after coming back from maternity leave. It was a pet project that I had been working on for a really long time, but I felt like, to do the workshop justice, I needed to be in postpartum too because it had been so long. So, I had all the science and the strategy down, but I needed to be in the mindset of it when I created it. 

I had this workshop, tickets sold, and then the coronavirus happened, and I was like, ‘Rreally?!’ The first in-person thing that I going to do in over three years. So, I flipped it to an online workshop. We met through Zoom. I went through it with a cohort of a handful of moms once and then again and again. Through that, I molded it into what it is now as a self-paced course that, whenever a mom needs it, they can go in and work through the modules. 

It’s all the pieces that we’ve talked about that moms need over the past bit of our conversation. It’s the constant reminder to give yourself grace with the strategy of one small step at a time. Focusing on that opportunity mindset and doing the thing that you can do right now so that you can run with confidence when your body is ready. 

Shayla:

That’s so amazing that you were able to pivot and still bring the course to life and bring it into the world even in the midst of coronavirus. I think that’s really awesome. 

Alison:

Yeah, so it’s funny. Because I was coaching online for so long, I feel like, in some ways, it actually ended up as a better program because I did it online again. Because it’s what I was comfortable with. The way I organize everything and present everything, the teacher in me, it fits better with the online course platform, I think. 

Shayla:

If you want to learn more about Alison’s Navigating Postpartum Fitness for Runners course, you can find a quick link to the course description in this episode’s show notes. I’m also very excited to share that, as a special gift to you as this show’s listeners, Alison is offering 10 percent off her course with the coupon code, RunnerMoms. Simply enter the coupon code RunnerMoms – all one word – during the checkout process on her website. I’ll add those details as well as the coupon code in this episode’s show notes for easy reference.  

Thank you so much for joining me on the show today, Alison. I really enjoyed our conversation and know that the Runner Moms community is going to get a lot of value out of the wealth of actionable tips that you provided. 

If others want to connect with you, where should they go?

Alison:

You can find me, it’s AlisonMariePhD. That’s my thing everywhere – Facebook, Instagram and my website, alisonmariephd.com. 

Shayla:

I’ll include links with all of those ways to connect with Alison in the episode’s show notes. Well, thank you again for joining us on the show today, Alison. I can’t wait to release this episode and have a great weekend!

Alison:

Thank you so much for having me!

Shayla:

Thanks for listening to this episode of the Runner Moms podcast. Be sure to also head over to our website Runner Moms dot com for more inspiring stories and also to check out our collection of energizing recipes. Until next time, happy running and happy momming. 

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